BLOODROP (7', Russia, 2011)

 

ALEXEI POPOGREBSKY, the director of How I Ended This Summer (winner of two Silver Bears at the 2010 Berlinale), signs the surrealist BLOODROP. Originally designed for 3D, this movie stretches the borders between reality and fiction; the story focuses on a man who finds that for a brief period, the 2D world of a framed picture becomes a 3D world ripe for exploration. But how long will it last, where will it lead him and will he be able to get back?

Director: ALEXEI POPOGREBSKY

 

Cast: GRIGORY DOBRYGIN, INA-MARIA JAICH

Screenplay: ALEXEI POPOGREBSKY

Cinematography: PETER STEUGER

Editing: VLADIMIR KRUG

Music: DMITRI KATKHANOV

Sound: DMITRI BATYZHEV

Producer: ARTEM VASILIEV, KARINA KABANOVA

Production: METRAFILMS



World Sales

METRAFILMS

ARTEM VASILIEV

+7 (495) 956 61 80

www.metrafilms.ru/en

production[at]metrafilms[dot]ru

 

 

ALEXEI POPOGREBSKY (b 1972, Moscow) is a Russian director and scriptwriter. He debuted together with his friend, Boris Khlebnikov, with Roads to Koktebel in 2003. Previously having made short-films together, this movie is what brings them to attention, having won several international film prizes, including the FIPRESCI Discovery of the Year at the Cannes Film Festival. However, it was his third feature that established his status as a prominent director, How I Ended This Summer. He is currently working on his fourth feature, Lost Rooms, “a 3D film with an international cast that takes on illusions to reveal true emotions.” (Rotterdam IFF)

 

Romanian Premiere

 

BLOODROP is a surrealistic depiction of crossing between parallel realities that challenges the viewer’s perception of everyday life. Existing separately but somehow together, the two worlds are diametrical opposites: one chaotic, loud and crowded, the other one calm, orderly, impeccable. Intruding in the girl’s world, the male character breaks the border that separates their alternate realities. Having meticulously executed sets and compelling visuals, this short movie is most fascinating in how it constructs and deconstructs the illusion it proposes. A 2D image becomes a three-dimensional space ready to be explored, but not touched. The moment the male character tries to take hold of objects around the room, they revert to their 2D state, to being cut-out images of those objects. The seeming perfection of that universe proves to be paper thin.” (Diana Mereoiu, BIEFF 2012)

 

“We used the opportunity to test some concepts in 3D and see how it would translate to 2D, and vice versa.” (ALEXEI POPOGREBSKY)

 

 

3D ANAGLYPH VERSION

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